387th Replacement Battalion, US Army

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Official blazon

Shield: Celeste (Bluebird), a Philippine sun throughout Argent charged with two bars wavy Azure (Dark Blue) debruised with a chess rook Gules.
Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: From a wreath Argent and Celeste (Light Blue) the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the Common in Lexington, Massachusetts.
Motto: HOMINES SUPRA ACTIONEM (People Then Action).

Distinctive Unit Insignia. Description: A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall, consisting of a silver Philippine sun on a light blue background above a red heraldic chess rook surmounting two horizontal wavy blue bands and all beneath and between a red scroll, arched at top, the ends curving upward and terminating at the upper corners of the blue wavy bands inscribed “HOMINES SUPRA ACTIONEM” (People Then Action) in silver letters.

Origin/meaning

Shield: Dark blue and scarlet are the colors traditionally associated with the Adjutant General’s Corps. The organization’s World War II service in the Philippines and the award of the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation are symbolized by the colors blue, white and red. The sun adapted from the Philippine flag. The two other World War II campaigns, New Guinea and Leyte, are represented by the two wavy blue bands alluding to water and referring to the Pacific Theater. The chess rook refers to the unit’s ability to maneuver on the battlefield and to its mission as a Replacement Battalion.

Distinctive Unit Insignia: Dark blue and scarlet are the colors traditionally associated with the Adjutant General’s Corps. The organization’s World War II service in the Philippines and the award of a Philippine Presidential Unit Citation are symbolized by the colors blue, white and red, and the sun adapted from the Philippine flag. The two other campaigns during that period, New Guinea and Leyte, are represented by the two wavy blue bands alluding to water and referring to the Pacific Theater. The chess rook refers to the ability to maneuver on the battlefield and to the unit’s service as a Replacement Battalion during World War II. Symbolically the chess rook can also apply to the organization’s current mission in the area of personnel.

The coat of arms was approved on 25 November 1996. The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 387th Personnel and Administration Battalion on 8 July 1977. It was redesignated for the 387th Replacement Battalion with description and symbolism revised on 19 October 1990.



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Literature: Information from The Institute of Heraldry, US Army.