Friedrichshafen

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  • Total pages in the German section : 19,350

FRIEDRICHSHAFEN

State : Baden-Württemberg
District (Kreis) : Bodenseekreis (until 1973 Tettnang)
Additions : 1937 Schnetzenhausen; 1971 Ailingen (1937 Berg), Raderach; 1972 Ettenkirch (1937 Hirschlatt), Kluftern

Wappen von Friedrichshafen

Official blazon

In gespaltenem Schild vorne in Gold eine bewurzelte grüne Buche, hinten in Rot ein silbernes Hifthorn mit dem Mundstück nach unten, goldener Fessel und goldenen Beschlägen.

Origin/meaning

Friedrichshafen was founded by the Counts of Buchhorn, who ruled the city until 1089. Until 1811 the city was officially named Buchhorn.
In 1275 the city became an imperial city and the first seal dates from the same time. It shows a canting horn hanging on a canting beech (Buche). Above the tree the Imperial eagle was shown. In the 15th century the beech was flanked by two horns, still under the eagle. Also from the 15th century the oldest arms are known. These showed the beech and a horn side by side. In the early 17th century the shield was divided and the colours were defined.

The arms have not basically changed since, except that the shape and size of the figures changed according to the fashion of the time.

Wappen von Friedrichshafen

The arms in a manuscript +/- 1530
Arms of Friedrichshafen

The arms on a coin from around 1700
Siegel von Friedrichshafen

The municipal stamp shown in 1892
Siegel von Friedrichshafen

Seal from around 1900
Wappen von Friedrichshafen

The arms in the Wappen-Sammlung (+/- 1910)
Wappen von Friedrichshafen

The arms in the Abadie albums
Wappen von Friedrichshafen

The arms by Hupp in the Kaffee Hag albums +/- 1925


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Literature : Stadler, 1964-1971, 8 volumes; Kaffee Hag Albums, 1920s