Kinross

From Heraldry of the World
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Logo-new.jpg
Heraldry of the World
United Kingdom.jpg
British heraldry portal
Civic heraldry of the United Kingdom
Unitedkingdom-flag.gif

  • Overseas possessions
  • Total pages in the British section : 6,334
  • Total images in the British section : 5,573

KINROSS

Burgh

Incorporated into : 1975 Perth and Kinross District Council (1996 Perth and Kinross Area Council)

Arms (crest) of Kinross

Official blazon

Argent, between two piles Gules, a representation of the Market Cross of the Burgh therefrom pendant the jougs all Proper; on a chief of the Second, two mullets of the field.

Above the Shield is placed a mural coronet suitable to a Burgh and in an Escrol under the same this Motto "Siccar".

Origin/meaning

The arms were granted on July 23, 1934.

Kinross was created a Burgh of Barony in 1540-41 in favour of Robert Douglas of Loch Leven, and was raised to a Burgh of Regality in favour of Sir William Bruce of Kinross in 1685.

The arms are closely related to those of Douglas of Loch Leven, the major difference being that the third pile in the Douglas arms has been replaced by a representation of the Town Cross, with its iron "jougs", an old instrument of punish­ment by which defaulters could be secured to the Cross.

The Town Cross was shown on the Burgh seal and also the motto "Siccar" which, while obviously referring to the "jougs", has clearly a connection with the "Lock Sicker" of the Earls of Morton; this Earldom was inherited by Sir William Douglas of Loch Leven in 1588 and until the early eighteenth century the Earls of Morton lived at Kinross.


seal of Kinross

Seal of the burgh as used in the 1890s

Community Council

Arms (crest) of Kinross

Official blazon

Argent, between two piles Gules a representation of the Market Cross of the Burgh therefrom pendant the jougs all Proper, on a chief of the Second two mullets of the Field.

Above the Shield is placed a Coronet appropriate to a statutory Community Council, videlicet:- a circlet richly chased from which are issuant four thistle leaves (one and two-halves visible) and four pine cones (two visible) Or, and in an Escrol under the same this Motto "Siccar".

Origin/meaning

The arms were granted on February 25, 1987.

These are the Burgh arms with a crown of a community council.


Support the site:

Contact us:

Our partners:



© since 1995, Heraldry of the World, Ralf Hartemink

Literature : Porteous, 1906; Urquhart, 1974, 2001