Schwabach

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  • Total pages in the German section : 19,888
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SCHWABACH

State : Bayern
Free Urban District (Kreisfreie Stadt) : Schwabach
Additions : 1972 Büchenbach, Ottersdorf, Penzendorf (partly),Wolkersdorf

Wappen von Schwabach

Official blazon

In Rot auf silbernem Brückenbogen ein blau bedachter silberner Zinnenturm, beseitet rechts von einem goldenen Schild, darin ein rot bewehrter schwarzer Adler, links von einem blauen Schild, darin ein rot bewehrter goldener Löwe zwischen goldenen Schindeln.


Origin/meaning

The arms were granted on July 1 1953 and are based on the oldest seal of the city, which is known since 1329, but probably dates from 1330, when Schwabach received town rights.

The bridge is the local bridge, first mentioned in 1343, the tower is most likely the Kammerstein castle. The eagle is the Imperial eagle and represents the imperial estates in the city, the lion is the lion of Nassau as the Counts of Nassau ruled the city since 1299 as Imperial vassals.

Since the 15th and until 1953 the city used different arms, combining the lion with the arms of the (Hohen)Zollern dynasty, as well as symbols for the Beer brewing industry in the city, see below.

Wappen von Schwabach

The 'old' arms by Tyroff (1835)
Wappen von Schwabach

The 'new' arms by Tyroff (1835)
Wappen von Schwabach

The arms in the Wappen-Sammlung album +/- 1915
Wappen von Schwabach

The arms by Hupp in the Kaffee Hag albums +/- 1925

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Literature : Stadler, 1964-1971, 8 volumes; Hupp, O: Kaffee Hag albums, 1920s