Uckfield

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Heraldry of the World
Civic heraldry of the United Kingdom
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UCKFIELD (Rural district council)

Incorporated into : 1974 Wealden

Uckfield.jpg

Official blazon

Arms : Argent on a Field in base Vert an Oak Tree fructed and leaved proper between two Martlets respectant in fesse Azure all within a Bordure gobony of the first and last.
Crest : On a Wreath of the Colours upon a Mount Vert a Boar rampant Sable armed and unguled Or supporting a Cresset fired proper.
Motto : 'LIKE AS THE OAK'

Origin/meaning

The arms were officially granted on January 30, 1948.

The oak tree represents Ashdown Forest, and depicted growing out of a green field, plays on the name of Uckfield (an old spelling is Okkefeld), which suggests an oak in a field. The field is also intended to typify the district's agricultural activities. The two blue martlets represent the County of Sussex, and the blue and sil­ver border, of the Lancastrian colours, represents John of Gaunt's association with Ashdown Forest, which was once known as Lancaster Great Park.

The boar or hog is a rebus of Ralph Hogge, the ironmaster of Buxted, who cast the first iron cannon in this country. The black boar stands erect against a blazing beacon, which represents Crowborough Beacon, the highest point of the District, where the Council Offices were stuated.

The motto is from the opening words of a poem on Samuel Pepys, by Rudyard Kipling, once a resident of Crowborough. The first stanza of the poem reads: Like as the Oak, whose roots descend. Through earth and stillness seeking food, Most apt to furnish in the end That dense, indomitable wood.

Literature : Information provided by here