Wick

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  • Overseas possessions
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WICK

Royal Burgh of Wick

Incorporated into : 1975 Caithness District Council (1996 Highland Area Council)

Arms (crest) of Wick

Official blazon

Azure, a chevron round-embattled on the upper edge and ensigned of a cross patée at the apex close-fitched Argent, between two lymphads Ot, sails of the Second, flagged Gules, in chief, and in base upon the sea barry wavy Argent and Vert, an ancient boat of the Third, therein two naked men Proper handling oars in action Sable, and a bishop erect attired of the Second, mitred of the Third, holding in his sinister hand a book of the Last, his dexter hand raised in act ofblessing, and in the base of the shield, a crosier-head also of the Third.

Above the Shield which is ensigned of the Burghal coronet is placed in an Escrol this Motto "Nisi Dominus Frustra", and below the Shield is placed a Compartment suitable to a Burgh Royal, its turrets having string-courses engrailed and thereon this Motto "Wick Works Weil".

Origin/meaning

The arms were granted on July 21, 1954.

Wick, which had probably been a Burgh of Barony from about 1400, was created a Royal Burgh by King James VI in 1589.

The arms combine the features of two seals which it has used. The blue and gold colours are those of the ancient Earldom of Caithness and the round-embattled chevron with the cross, the old Church of St. Fergus, patron saint of Wick, which was a prominent landmark from the sea.
The two ships in chief refer to the town's important connections with shipping and fishing.
Below the chevron there is St. Fergus shown as a bishop in a boat with a crosier-head underneath; the saint is reported to have come by sea from Ireland to Scotland.

There are two mottoes; the Latin 'Nisi Dominus Frustra' is the same as used by Edinburgh and was only granted after permission of the Edinburgh council. The second 'Wick Works Weil', as a derivative of the arms of the Sinclair Earls of Caithness, as also used by the Caithness County Council and Thurso.

Arms of Wick

The old seal from Wick

Wick Community Council

Arms (crest) of Wick

Official blazon

Azure, a chevron round-embattled on the upper edge and ensigned of a cross pattée at the apex close-fitched Argent, between two lymphads Or, sails of the Second, flagged Gules, in chief, and in base upon the sea barry wavy Argent and Vert, an ancient boat of the Third, therein two naked men Proper handling oars in action Sable, and a Bishop erect attired of the Second, mitred of the Third, holding in his sinister hand a book of the Last, his dexter hand raised in the act of blessing, and in the base of the shield a crozier head also of the Third.

Above the Shield is placed a Coronet appropriate to a statutory Community Council, videlicet:- a circlet richly chased from whích are issuant four thistle leaves (one and two halves visible) and four pine cones (two visible) Or, and in an Escrol below the same this Motto "Wick Works Weil".

Origin/meaning

The arms were granted on December 12, 1989.

These arms are the same as the old Burgh arms, without the compartment and the Latin motto, and with a new crown.


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© since 1995, Heraldry of the World, Ralf Hartemink

Literature : Urquhart, 1979 ; 2001