Neuss

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  • Total pages in the German section : 22
  • Total images in the German section : 25,764

NEUSS

State : Nordrhein-Westfalen
District (Kreis) : Rhein-Kreis Neuss
Additions : 1929 Grimlinghausen, Uedesheim, Weckhoven; 1975 Holzheim, Norf, Rosellen

Wappen von Neuss

Origin/meaning

The arms of Neuss show the Imperial eagle, granted to the city in 1475 by Emperor Friedrich III.

The left half shows a silver cross in red, the origin thereof is not quite clear. It may be a symbol of the crusades in general; it may be derived from the cross of the State of Köln, to which the city belonged; or it may be the symbol of St. Quirinus or Rome.
The latter appears on the oldest knowsn seal of the city of Neuss, known from 1245, but proabably a few decades older. This very large seal (9,5 cm diameter) shows a city gate or castle, with St. Quirinus standing on a dragon and dressed as a knight. He holds a shield with a lion. On later seals and coins the cross appeared as the symbol for the city.

The crown first appears in 1560, the lions in 1637. Afterwards the arms did not really change, except for the (common) omission of the red claws and beak of the eagle in many cases.

Wappen von Neuss

Seal of Neuss from around 1245
Arms of Neuss

The arms on a 1569 coin
Wappen von Neuss

The arms in the Wappen-Sammlung (+/- 1910)
Seal of Neuss

Seal from around 1900
Seal of Neuss

Seal from around 1900
Wappen von Neuss

The arms by Hupp in the Kaffee Hag albums +/- 1925
Wappen von Neuss

The arms as shown in a book from 1938
Wappen von Neuss

The arms on a 1960s matchox label
Arms of Neuss

The arms in the Abadie albums

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Literature : Stadler, 1964-1971, 8 volumes; Hupp, 1920s; Diederich, 1984